HOW TO PREPARE

How Job Candidates Can Prepare For Employment Tests

Have you applied for a job and been asked to take a pre-employment test? It may seem intimidating, but there’s no reason to stress! No matter what type of assessment you've been asked to take, there are a couple of steps you can take to prepare yourself. So how should you get ready for a Criteria assessment?

person on computer, email prompt

Take a deep breath.

Assessments are designed so that employers can learn about you in an objective way. Keep in mind that your assessment results are just one of many factors companies use to evaluate applicants. Before you start your assessments, give yourself the time and space to relax so that you can show your best self in the assessment.
 

Set the stage.

Many employers ask applicants to take a test before the interview stage. If you are taking a test remotely, not at an employer’s place of business, figure out how long it will take you to complete the tests and then limit all distractions during that time. Criteria’s tests can be taken on any device, including laptop, desktop, tablet, or mobile devices. Use a device that you feel most comfortable with, and take time to turn off or mute any notifications that may pop up during the assessment. If you are in a shared space, let others around you know that you are planning to take an assessment for a certain amount of time.
 

Read the instructions.

The most common mistake test-takers make is rushing through instructions. You can take as much time as you want to read and understand them! The instructions will often give you hints about optimal test strategy: for example, if there is no penalty for wrong answers, don’t be afraid to guess and move on if you’re stuck on a tough question.
 

Get Familiar with the Tests

Familiarize yourself with the different types of assessments you may be asked to take so you feel more at ease.
 

Personality Tests

Personality tests are designed to measure traits that are associated with successful performance of a certain role. They evaluate behavioral traits that don't tend to change much over time. There are no right or wrong answers on these tests, but in specific jobs certain traits are known to predict how well your personality matches the requirements of the job. These tests help determine if you'd be happy and comfortable in a position long-term. So don't fake it! You can't change your personality and you shouldn't have to for a job. You could wind up in a role that isn't a good match for you and end up where you are now: looking for a new job.

Aptitude Tests

Cognitive aptitude tests measure your critical thinking, problem-solving, attention to detail, and ability to learn and use new information. Criteria's most popular aptitude test is the CCAT, which gives employers an idea of how fast you learn and how well you'll perform in your new position. Want to know more about the Criteria Cognitive Aptitude Test? Check out the prep guide.

Emotional Intelligence Tests

Emotional intelligence (EI) tests provide a measure of your ability to understand emotions and to use them effectively. Criteria’s emotional intelligence test is ability-based, meaning that there isn’t a way to actively prepare for the test.

Skills Tests

Skills tests let employers figure out what you already know. Some tests check your basic math and verbal skills, while others confirm your computer literacy. There are tests that demonstrate your familiarity with computers, how fast you type, or how well you know a particular Microsoft Office program. These are simple tests designed to prove that you’ve got the necessary skills to succeed in the role.
 

Warm up.

The best policy for warming up is to relax, clear your space from distractions, and dedicate your focus to the assessments. If you’d like extra prep for aptitude tests like the CCAT, try out JobFlare, a free app created by Criteria for job seekers. JobFlare consists of brain games that test the same abilities measured by aptitude tests like the CCAT: math skills, verbal ability, attention to detail, and spatial reasoning.